Tag Archives: colic

Natural Cures With Black Seed

I’ve been nursing my 14 year old Jack Russell Terrier grand dog after a stay in the hospital for a serious case of pancreatitis. A horse client suggest I join the yahoo support group and it has provided me with an abundance of new and interesting information. Have you heard of Black Seed? I hadn’t until now, but will be reading more and sharing:

Black seed is a plant. People have used the seed to make medicine for over 2000 years. It was even discovered in the tomb of King Tut.

Historically, black seed has been used for headache, toothache, nasal congestion, and intestinal worms. It has also been used for “pink eye” (conjunctivitis), pockets of infection (abscesses), and parasites.

Today, black seed is used for treating digestive tract conditions including gas, colic, diarrhea, dysentery, constipation, and hemorrhoids. It is also used for respiratory conditions including asthma, allergies, cough, bronchitis, emphysema, flu, swine flu, and congestion.

Other uses include lowering blood pressure, lowering cholesterol levels, treating cancer, and boosting the immune system. You may read that a patent has been issued to cover the use of black seed to improve immunity, but don’t be misled. The presence of a patent doesn’t mean black seed has been shown to be effective for this use.

Women use black seed for birth control, to start menstruation, and to increase milk flow.

Black seed is sometimes used in combination with cysteine, vitamin E, and saffron to ease the side effects of a chemotherapy drug called cisplatin.

Some people apply black seed directly to the skin for joint pain (rheumatism), headache, and certain skin conditions.

In foods, black seed is used as a flavoring or spice.

How does it work?

There is some scientific evidence to suggest that black seed might help boost the immune system, fight cancer, prevent pregnancy, and lessen allergic reactions by acting as an antihistamine, but there isn’t enough information in humans yet.

Scientific studies have shown that the administration of black seeds have a beneficial effect against pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal forms of cancer. Chronic pancreatitis, or inflammation of the pancreas, is often a precursor to the occurrence of pancreatic cancer. A study performed by the Department of Surgery at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania revealed that a chemical present in black seeds decreased inflammation of the pancreas which inhibited the production of pancreatic cancer cells. The chemical responsible for these protective properties is thymoquinone. Thymoquinone is one of the chemicals in black seeds that is responsible for the antioxidant benefits of black seeds.

How to Help Your Horse Deal With Heat

Heat Advisory for Horses

What's New ImageSpraying off your horse can be effective at lowering body temperature.

Here are ten important tips to prevent heat related problems in horses.

1. Heat can kill: High environmental temperatures and related heat issues of dehydration, exhaustion, and heat stroke can occur in horses and can produce illness and death. This is serious business and you must take steps to ensure your horse is protected when traveling in a trailer, being ridden on trail rides, or in competition events.

2. Drink water: Maintain hydration in your horse by allowing free access to water at all times during hot weather. It is a myth that a hot horse drinking water will experience colic or other medical problems. Never let your horse pass up a chance to drink water. Only horses that have been deprived of water for a significant time (many hours or days) need to have water provided in smaller amounts over time. Let your horse drink on the trail or after a class at a show. Hint- You can lead a horse to water .  . .  . this is true, so offer some hay and your horse will often drink after eating the hay. Soup-consistency bran or pellet mashes are another means of getting extra water into your horse

3. Shade: Provide shade as much as possible.

4. Limit what you do with your horse during peak heat:

  • Ride or compete with your horse in the early mornings when it is cooler.
  • Have the ride or event management consider a change in the program schedule to limit afternoon activities during peak heat.
  • Shorten your ride.
  • Go slower and provide frequent breaks for your horse, in shade.
  • Encourage your horse to drink whenever they want water.

5. Ventilation: Provide open vents and windows in trailers which can open for cross ventilation (however, don’t let your horse stick its head out while on the road).

6. Know signs of fatigue and overheating in your horse and stop before more severe signs of heat exhaustion begin: Persistent high respiratory rate that does not come down with rest over 10-30 minutes (normal is 20-40 breaths per min). Change in mentation, decreased energy level and reluctance to keep going. Dry mucous membranes in the mouth (they should feel “slimy”). Prolonged capillary refill time—Push on your horse’s gum. They should be pink to start, then it will blanch to white after pressure, and return to pink in approximately one second.  Check this at the start of your day and frequently throughout the day. If it is prolonged, your horse is trying to tell you to stop, rest, provide water and if other signs of colic or muscle pain occur, you need to stay put and seek veterinary attention. Gut sounds—Listen at the start of your day (if you don’t have a stethoscope put your ear on your horse’s flank- behind the ribs). You should hear gurgling sounds on both sides of the belly– that is normal and good. Quiet gut sounds are a warning that your horse may be heading for dehydration or exhaustion.

7. Fans: If in a barn with limited ventilation, try to arrange more air circulation by careful placement of a fan in front of the stall or in the aisle way. Keep electric cords out of reach of horses.

8. Hose (spray) off your horse or pour water from a bucket over your horse. Cool water is fine, normal temperature (not hot) water is good too. Evaporation produces cooling and continuous hosing is one of the most effective means of lowering body temperature.

9. Water source: Keep a supply of water available for your horse to drink.  Obtain some clean 5 gallon cans and fill them up with water before you travel.

10. Electrolytes: These may be useful if the horse has been sweating excessively. Only use if they can be followed by access to water to drink. Have a plan outlined by your veterinarian if you have not used electrolytes before. Only use electrolytes specifically made for horses.

Trailering Tips in the Heat
If you need to trailer your horse, do so in the cool early morning or late evening hours when it is cooler. Don’t leave your horse in a parked trailer, especially if there is no shade. Just as with a parked car, temperatures inside a trailer can rapidly reach 140 degrees and the horse can quickly develop heat stroke.Provide as much ventilation and airflow as safely as possible on the road.Be very careful with hauling foals – they appear to be even more susceptible to heat than adult horses.

Tips provided by:

John Madigan, DVM, Diplomate ACVIM, ACAW*

Gary Magdesian, DVM, Diplomate ACVIM, ACVECC**

W. David Wilson, BVMS, MS, MRCVS***

*International Animal Welfare Training Institute

**Head- Equine Critical Care- VMTH

***Director- Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (VMTH)

School of Veterinary Medicine University of California-Davis

 

How Many Pesticides Did You and Your Horse Eat Today?

There are hundreds of studies showing that pesticides alter the immune system in animals used in experiments. Pesticides reduce the white blood cell  and lymphocyte count. Lymphoctyes fight and kill bacteria and viruses.

One way to combat the assault to our systems from pesticides is to minimize our intake of commercial food, for our animals and ourselves. Eating organic foods is a good place to start. Read labels: ingredients like ethoxyquin (added to animal foods as a preservative) have been shown to cause cancer, liver disease, allergies, autoimmune diseases and much more. This would be a very long post if I listed every problem caused by pesticides and preservatives.I avoid feeds whose manufacturers spend tons of money on advertising. I would prefer that the money goes into the feed…

Meals and middlings should also be avoided in horse and dog feed. These are cheap fillers used by manufacturers to save money and cut corners. Meals have been twice heated and have lost most of their nutrients. It is like feeding sawdust. Look for words like “extruded grain, whole grain” and for our dogs and cats the first ingredient should be a whole meat, not meal. I have been told by several equine vets that meal can cause colic, as it is not digestible.

I know my diet is not perfect, so I enhance my ability to respond to the modern challenges of pollution, pesticides, genetically modified foods, etc. by taking Transfer Factor.

Check my “I recommend” line of products that you can order right here.

Equine Diet

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